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Fourteen Points of Quaid-e-Azam

 Fourteen Points of Quaid-e-Azam

Introduction

In 1928, an All Parties Conference was convened to solve the constitutional problems of India. A committee was set up under Pandit Lal Nehru. That committee prepared a report, which is known as “Nehru Report.” This report demanded “Dominion status” for India. Separate electorates were refused and the reservation of seats for the Muslims of Bengal and Punjab was rejected. In this report, not a single demand of the Muslims was upheld.

Since Nehru Report was the last word from Hindus therefore Mr. Jinnah was authorized to draft in concise terms the basis of any future constitution that was to be devised for India. Originally these demands were Fourteen in number and so they popularly came to be known as “Jinnah’s Fourteem Points.”

In March 1929, at the  annual session of All india Muslim league, he declared his famous fourteen points.

Jinnah’s Fourteen Points – 1929

1.    Federal System

The form of the future constitution should be federal with the residuary powers reste d in the provinces.

2.    Provincial Autonomy

A uniform measure of autonomy shall be granted to all provinces.

3.    Represention of Minorities

All legislative in the country and other elected bodies shall be constituted on the definite principles of adequate and effective representation of minorities in every province without reducing the majority in any province to a minority or even equality.

4.    Number of Muslim Representatives

In the central legislative, Muslims representatives shall be not less than one-third.

5.    Separate Electorates

Representative of communal groups shall continue to be by means of separate electorates as at present provided it shall be open to any community, at any time, to abandon its separate electorate in favour of joint electorate.

6.    Muslim Majority Provinces

Any territorial re-distribution that might at any time be necessary shall not in any way, effect the Muslim majority in Punjab, Bengal and N.W.F.P.

7.    Religious Liberty

Full religious liberty, liberty of belief, worship and observance, association and education shall be guaranteed to all the communication.

8.    Three-Fourth Representation

No bill or resolution shall be passed in any legislative or any other elected body if three-fourths of the members of any community in that particular body oppose such a bill.

9.    Separation of Sind

Sind should be separated from Bombay Presidency.

10.           Introduction of Reforms in N.W.F.P and Baluchistan

Reforms should be introduced in the North-West Frontier Province and Baluchistan on the same footing as in other provinces.

11.           Government Services

Muslims should be given adequate share along with other Indians in the services of State.

12.           Protection of Muslim’s culture and Language

The constitution should embody adequate safeguard for the protection of Muslim culture, language, religion and civilization.

13.           One - Third Muslim Ministers

No cabinet, either central or provincial be formed. Without being a proportion of at least one-third Muslim Ministers.

14.           Constitution

No change shall be made in the  constitution of State except with the concurrence of State constituting the Indian Federation.

The reasonable and moderate demands, contained in the fourteen points, were rejected by the Hindus leaders which considerably widened the gulf between the two communities.

Importance of Jinnah’s Fourteen Points

A comparison of the Nehru Report with the Quaid-e-Azam’s Fourteen points shows that the political gap between the Muslims and the Hindus had really widened. Fourteen points of Quaid-e-Azam became principles for Muslims of India. These points made it clear to Hindus and British Government that Muslims wanted their own identity without influence by Hindus. Fourteen points not only revived Muslim League but also directed them on a new way. These points prepared the Muslims of India for a bold step to struggle for freedom.

The importance of these points can be judged by the fact that these points were presented in the Round Table Conference of 1930.

As a result, these points became the demands of the Muslims and greatly influenced the Muslims thinking for the next two decades till the establishment of Pakistan in 1947.

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